Managing a GoDaddy email address through GMail

GMail is pretty great. Easy to use, accessible regardless of machine, and free. Both Jason and I like to use it for our primary accounts 1. Back in the day, as shiny new business owners, we obviously also wanted to have gleaming, veneered Tenjin-branded addresses.

So, we originally just set up GoDaddy 2 with “Forwarding”-type, <xyz>@tenjin.ca addresses and pointed the spam-cannons at our GMail nexus 3 accounts. Fast forward a couple years, and we need to set up a new email account 4. So we just go in, and make a new Forwarding account, right? Ha! Ha! Gotcha. DevOps, IT and other support never Just Works.

Turns out that Google has, in the interim period, changed its policy on how Send-Mail-As works. It needs to log in with SMTP over SSL 5 now.

After far too much googling about Google I managed to piece together some facts:

  1. There doesn’t seem to be any one place where this process, specifically for GoDaddy, is definitively outlined.
  2. Most people in the Google forums essentially tried random combinations until it worked
  3. The ones who didn’t likely gave up and started constructing a colourful logo-shaped voodoo doll
  4. I hate the internet. And the Web. And especially email protocols.
  5. On the plus side, this process will remove the ugly “via” and “on behalf of” sender tags that reveal the original GMail source.

Once many Bothans died to bring me that new information 6, I cobbled together The Solution. Here it is, generalized 7 so that all you need to do is replace “bob” with your appropriate email name, and “example.com” with your own domain.

Tell GMail to manage a GoDaddy email

Bob wants to use bob@gmail.com to seamlessly manage his GoDaddy email, bob@example.com.

  1. Create a regular Godaddy email account – not a forwarding account.
    1. Log into GoDaddy.
    2. Under Products, find Email. Click Launch
    3. If you have a forwarding account, you’ll need to delete it first.
    4. Click Create to create a regular account for the desired address (eg. bob@example.com). We have enough from the addresses we’re managing, but you might need to buy a package or whatever.
  2. Login to your GMail account. If you don’t have one yet, create it.
  3. Tell GMail how to send mail through your GoDaddy domain.
    1. Click the Gear icon (top right), choose Settings.
    2. Click on -> Accounts and Import ->
    3. Under Send mail as ->, click Add another email address you own
    4. Name: Your name
    5. Email address: Your GoDaddy email address (eg. bob@example.com)
    6. Click Next Step
    7. Use these settings
      • SMTP Server: smtpout.secureserver.net
      • Port: 465
      • Username: Your full GoDaddy email address (eg. bob@example.com)
      • Password: Your Godaddy email account password
      • Select Secured connection using SSL
      • Click Add Account
      • Log into your GoDaddy webmail and grab the verification code that GMail sent. Use that to complete the process.
  4. Tell GMail how to receive mail from your GoDaddy domain
    1. While still under Gear -> Settings -> Accounts and Import,
    2. Scroll down for the Check mail from other accounts (using POP3) section
    3. Click Add a POP3 mail account you own
    4. Email address: Your GoDaddy email address (eg. bob@example.com)
    5. Click Next Step
    6. Use these settings:
      • Username: Your full GoDaddy email again (eg. bob@example.com)
      • Password: Your GoDaddy email account password.
      • POP server: your POP mail server, which is at your domain (eg. mail.example.com). You might also be able to use pop.secureserver.net
      • Port: 995 [this is the SSL port. You want email to be as secure as possible.]
      • Check Always use a secure connection (SSL) when retrieving mail.
      • Leave Leave a copy of retrieved messages on the server unchecked. Enabling this would only eventually fill up the GoDaddy inboxover time. Since we want to use GMail entirely, it makes more sense for this setting to be off.

There you go. That should now run email through your own domain.

Notes:

  1. I should call them “nexus” accounts. It sounds way cooler to call things a “nexus”.
  2. Yeah, deal with it. I’m sure there are better, hipper Dee Enn Esses out there. It’s a devil-you-know-slash-convenience relationship.
  3. See? I told you. Cool as a Canadian cucumber.
  4. For reasons to be explained later.
  5. Okay, maybe SSL isn’t technically required for it to *work* but I can’t imagine anyone wanting to do emaily things in the clear.
  6. I lie. I already knew #3.
  7. It’s possible that this might be even further generalizable to other DNS providers, but that’s left as an exercise for the reader.